Archive for the ‘snacks’ Category

you can’t call it cheatin’

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Monday morning we were in much better shape (due to a distinct lack of residual corned beef, as well as lower alcohol consumption, I suspect) and we made it out of the hotel in time for the tail end of rush hour.

And waffles.

This truck is called Wafels and Dinges. They’re all over the city, but we stopped at the one in Columbus Circle.

I got the Brussels wafel with speculoos spread, which I’ve been reading about for years (or so it feels, I actually have no idea – I mean, doesn’t it feel like you were hearing about burrata when you were just a fetus at this point?)  and it was so fucking delicious that I really was just forced to use a curse word in that sentence.

It was so delicious that I don’t even care that I look like a squinty rabbit in this picture.

I dropped the last quarter of it on the ground.

It was the saddest thing that happened to me in the whole trip.

Crockett went for the special of the day, which was an apple pie waffle. Same waffle, apple pie spread, whipped cream, cinnamon, and lots of love (probably).  I’m sure it was good, but it was no speculoos. Seriously, cookie spread? Sounds so weird! SO NOT WEIRD. SO GOOD.

After Crockett finished his waffle and I had a moment of silence for the city-sidewalk-death of mine, we headed to Chelsea to see Highline Park and (more importantly) the Chelsea Market. Highline Park is the weirdest thing I’ve ever seen (<- complete and total lie). It’s like a museum walkway built twenty feet above the ground – the whole thing is only fifteenish feet wide and bedroom and office windows immediately surround it. Neat thing to do with an old train track, but still very strange. Crockett took a bunch of pictures but apparently I wasn’t feeling it, because I have zero. What I do have is a picture of the seafood sliders we shared from The Lobster Place in Chelsea Market. Crab one – good. Shrimp one – eh. Really, who genuinely likes tarragon? I’m asking. Lobster one – quite tasty but still no match for the one at The Empire. (Of COURSE I’m not sucking up to my hometown local, what’choo talkin’ bout.)

From there we hopped over to the Essex St. Market. We were exhausted, but I wanted to see Shopsin’s and get some cookies from Beurre & Sel.

Two shops at the market were closed, everything else was open. Those two shops were Shopsin’s and Beurre & Sel. Sigh. The whole thing was just like a confusing supermarket – it might have been cool if we hadn’t been to Chelsea Market first, but we had. We got Crockett some coconut water and moved on with our lives.

It turned out we were only a few blocks from the famous bagel-er (made up word? Judge says… probably!) Russ & Daughters, so we swung by to round out our brunch of tiny sandwiches.

Lox (don’t ask me what kind – the man behind the counter tried and then just said ‘mild?’ and I said ‘ok!’ and then he asked me what kind of cream cheese and I said ‘what kind do you like’ and he said ‘I like them all’ so I just picked and he said ‘spectacular’ and I couldn’t tell if he was mocking me or what but anyway) and scallion cream cheese on a plain mini bagel. Question: is the defining characteristic of New York bagels an exceptionally chewy crust?

Properly fortified, we headed back to midtown.

We stopped by the LEGO store and I pretended, just for a moment, that I was Liz Lemon. It was very exciting. I tried to talk Crockett into ice skating, because it turns out the rink in Rockefeller Center is there even when the tree isn’t, but then when he said he would it turned out I was just kidding because my feet hurt. Whoops.

Instead, we went by MOMA. Although they were lacking a giant Egyptian statue, their gift shop was way better than the Met’s. I call it a draw on the museums-we-didn’t-actually-go-into showdown.

We had a whole plan. We’d walked off our mini sandwiches, and we were going to have a late lunch at Don Antonio, another pizza place on my list-of-NY-pizza places (a list that didn’t actually include any traditional NY style pie places but wev), then nap, then head back out.

We showed up at Don Antonio at 3:31, and they were closed from 3:30 to 4:30. Their website said nothing about that, so I whined for awhile, and Crockett decided to move the nap up the list of things to do – I only made it a few blocks before freaking out and insisting I needed a drink and a chair asap.

I’m sometimes quite charming to travel with.

Victor’s Cafe saved me!

A daiquiri …

an avocado filled with bacon and tomato and monterey jack served with plaintain chips…

and some pretty hilarious avocado-as-creepy-crawly artwork by Crockett …

put the smile back on my face. (I think I took like seven pictures. Crockett was smiling in most of them  but I looked like an idiot. I have no idea what’s happening with him in this one but it’s my blog so HA. This may have been immediately after the bartender was talking about how he’d accidentally auditioned for a porn, so maybe Crockett’s mulling that over.)

The avocado didn’t turn out to be enough food, and it was a little after four thirty by the time we finished at Victor’s, so we decided to head back to Don Antonio. They’re doing traditional Neapolitan pizza, just like Motorino, but with some twists.

Crockett started with a beer that had a gorgeous label, and I had some … wine. People, I don’t even know anymore. A lot of things happened in these days, and many of those things were wine, ok?

We ordered two pizzas, even though we weren’t starving, because we absolutely had to try the house specialty. (This is not it.) This is a sausage pizza with fresh mozzarella and pistachio pesto that reminded me very much of the pizzas they sell on the street in Turkey. It got better with every bite, and was it’s absolute best at room temperature. Strange but true.

This is the house specialty. The dough is lightly fried prior to being topped with sauce and smoked mozzarella and baked. It was bizarre, and as far as ‘pizza’ goes it wasn’t anything special, but as a food all on it’s own? Fried bread with tasty sauce and cheese? I could eat that every single day. Also, it was $12, which struck me as crazy reasonable, especially considering we were in midtown Manhattan.

We had lots of leftovers and took them home, but I had to stop one more time before we hit the hotel.

Pinkberry peanut butter froyo! We don’t have Pinkberry in CO, so how could I resist?

I’m not going to lie -we almost didn’t make it back out of the hotel after all that. We’d walked for hours, eaten a bunch, drank… we were wiped. We napped until seven and then rallied, though, because we were in New York freaking City.

We went to the Apple Store.

Nope, not at all kidding.

Then we walked cross town to Hell’s Kitchen, to yet another place I’d stumbled across in my internet explorations of the city. It’s called Caseulla, and they specialize in wine and cheese. Naturally, we had some wine and cheese. Crockett also had a mead called Viking’s Blood, and everyone around us at the bar was fascinated and had to taste it too. Then our bartender tried to pick up our bar neighbor, even though he was pretty clearly already on a date.

Then we ate bacon popcorn and I realized it was Crockett’s birthday, because it was past midnight.

The bartender brought us goat cheese and Nutella truffles to celebrate, we ate them, and then we walked home.  It was our last night, but we were seriously wiped, so we decided to have one more drink at the hotel bar and then call it a night.  We did not see Chase Crawford or Blake Lively, but we did have cozy seats by the fireplace, so I think we made the right call. Then we slept hard. NY is exhausting, have I mentioned that?

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARISSA FINALLY

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

 

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So I’ve been looking for harissa everywhere. I assumed it would not be that hard to find – it’s not like Boulder county is a culinary wasteland. I checked at two different Whole Foods, a few grocery stores, and Super Target, and had no luck whatsoever. (A WF worker did helpfully inform me that they had something that had harisa in it – some kind of meal in a box, maybe? It was definitely not what I was looking for.)

Crockett and I went to Pacific Ocean Market, even, which is this absolutely INSANE Asian market a couple of towns over. We spent several minutes sniffing durian packages (not smelly until opened, apparently), many many minutes in the ramen aisle, and quite a significant amount of time discussing cocktails made with palm sugar, since there were several brands. We did not find harissa. Honestly, I knew it was a stretch, because harissa is from Tunisia which ain’t exactly Asian, but whatever.

I ordered it from Amazon.

While we were waiting for the harissa to come, I did make some tasty food.

IMG 3067

Pizza with roasted cherry tomatoes, pesto from our ridiculously prolific basil plant, and goat cheese. Served with roasted green beans because this was actually last Sunday and last Sunday I had this weird idea that we were going to eat a vegetable with every meal.

Photo 5

Red velvet cupcakes as a special request from a dear friend for her boyfriend.

Her boyfriend who totally ruined the surprise by buying himself two red velvet bundt cakes from Nothing Bundt Cakes the day before.

(I forgot to take pictures of them frosted, obviously, but I’ll give you the recipe tomorrow. It’s pretty good. I’ve worked pretty hard on it. And my cream cheese frosting is fucking amazing. Totally true.)

BUT then the harissa came!

NewImage

Harissa Chickpeas and Greens with Goat Cheese
Adapted from Not Without Salt

1 tablespoon oil
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 cups cooked chickpeas (or one 15 ounce can)
1 tablespoon harissa paste
3/4 tsp kosher salt
6 cups mixed greens, preferably the baby version of toughish varieties (spinach, kale) or spicy ones (arugula) – we used a whole prewashed box of mixed spinach and arugula
2 ounces goat cheese

Heat olive oil over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until the garlic is pale gold in color.

Stir in the harissa and dump in the chickpeas. Stir gently until they’re mostly covered with the paste, and then occasionally until you start to see golden spots on the chickpeas. You’re not just trying to heat them up, you’re actually trying to fry the outside just a little. (I was using a non-stick pan – use your judgement. If they start to stick, you can be done.)

Add the greens by the handful, stirring until they wilt. Divide into two dishes and top with crumbled goat cheese. (Feel free to serve over rice, if you like. I didn’t find it necessary but Crockett did.)

Serves two people who like heat. The harissa is spicy, but tasty.

 

heat wave

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

When I run in the morning, there are bunnies EVERYWHERE. You can see the two there, who could not have cared less about my presence or picture taking, but there is actually one in that yard further on and two out of the frame to the left as well.

I think they’re going out early to escape the heat, just like me.

When I got home from my run, I did what I usually do. I destroyed the kitchen while packing breakfast and lunch. I don’t know why I needed four containers of vegetables and two containers of yogurt all out at the same time. I do know why I needed an enormous container of blueberries, though.

Because blueberries are delicious! Duh. Also, Stash pomegranate raspberry green tea is slightly more tolerable than Tazo Zen green tea. I’m going to keep drinking it though – I think it’s probably like coffee. Nobody likes coffee at first, they just drink it because this is America and that’s what we drink, galdarnit.

There’s a slight possibility I’m wrong about that last part.

See, this is why I had to make such a big mess in the kitchen. It takes a lot of stuff to put together a salad of mixed greens with  chickpea chicken curry, a bag of mixed veggies, and a white bean basil dip.

(I’m totally lying. All of this, with the exception of the veggies, was already prepared.)

Something that is justifiably messy? A SUPER DUPER ripe peach. I took this picture to show how it the flesh was red like half an inch down from the skin. It was a glorious drippy experience.

When I got home, I found Crockett facing off against the heat – he was in the backyard assembling our new air conditioner! The swamp cooler has done it’s best, I’m not degrading it, but the air conditioner will mean that we can close up the house during the day without worrying about coming home to a … well, a swamp.

I dutifully assisted by sitting next to the window with a book and a glass of wine, so I could hand tools over when necessary.

This is how air conditioners work, right?

When we decided it was too dark to finish, I put together some pork tacos that were FAB. I’ll tell you about the pork and the slaw tomorrow, k? K.

Basil White Bean Spread

I’m calling this a spread because puree sounds sort of blah, and it’s not really hummus because it has a different kind of bean AND no nuts or seeds. SO. Spread.

1 cup dry cannellini beans or two 15 oz cans cannellini
As much basil as you need to remove from your basil plant (this would also work with other soft herbs – 1 to 2 handfuls is probably ideal)
1/4 – 1/2 cup olive oil
kosher salt (start with 1/4 of  a teaspoon if you used canned beans, 1/2 teaspoon if you cooked them yourself)
2 – 3 cloves raw garlic

If you’re starting with dry beans, you can use my new and exciting bean cooking method. Put them in a slow cooker on low with water to cover and cook for three hours. Test, add salt, and cook for another half hour to one and half hours, depending on how done they were. Don’t soak. DO look for rocks, though. It’s my understanding that rocks will never soften in a slow cooker. (You’re welcome.)

Either let the beans cool or rinse the starch off the canned beans, and put everything but the olive oil into a food processor. Whiz for awhile, scrape the sides, and then turn it back on and slowly pour in the smaller amount of olive oil.

This is where you get to exercise your personal preference. (Again, you’re super welcome). Taste it and add more salt, more olive oil, some bean water or some milk if you’d like it thinner but not more olive oily, and anything else you want. Suggestions include oil packed sundried tomatoes (definitely chop them first), pine nuts, or parmesan. Or olive. Man, now I wish I’d added olives. That’ll move you closer to a tapenade, but that’s ok! That’s why we called it a spread.

Eat on crackers, veggies, or as a sandwich spread. Or off a spoon. Or your finger. No judgement here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

whaa?

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

I just deleted a spam comment that included a spoiler from the season premiere of Glee. Low blow, spammers, low blow.

This whole no sugar thing does not lend itself to easily grabbed foods.

Unless you have things already prepared. And the only thing I had prepared was my last jalepeno spinach fritatta muffin.

To fill the caloric gap, I turned to the trusty celery vehicle and peanut butter.

Speaking of peanut butter – there are no pictures from dinner last night because Crockett was at a concert and dinner was me, a spoon, and a freshly opened jar of chunky pb.

Sometimes that’s just how you need to roll, you know?

Unshockingly, some peanut butter and a tiny muffin did not carry me happily through the morning. When I got home at 1:45, I was so hungry I was nauseous. Poor, poor planning.

I literally ate the first diet appropriate things that my hands landed on – a little Laughing Cow mozzarella and basil cheese wedge mixed up with some watery tomatoes, some hummus, half a package of button mushrooms to scoop it to my mouth, and some pickles. (Not pictured, the many many mushrooms with hummus that accidentally fell into my mouth on the way to the table.)

It was roughly as appealing as it looks, but I ate the hell out of it.

(Crockett just looked over my shoulder and asked what those delicious looking mushrooms are – so perhaps the pink sauce is in fact good looking if you didn’t eat it.)

Eating gave me enough energy to go for a short run in mah new shoes that I keep forgetting to write about, and then I showered and found that I desperately needed tea. Warm, sweet (artificial), delicious chai tea.

Oh, and also string cheese.

Because string cheese, yo.

I’m getting down to work now in our new kitchen accoutrement. This stool actually came from my townhouse, and when I moved into Crockett’s house we couldn’t find a place for it. We just today realized that all the way down, it’s roughly kitchen table height.

Also, it’s adorable.

It makes me feel like Judy Jetson. And everyone knows she was really good at statistics.

 

 

 

 

 

office hours

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

For the first time, students came to my office hours today.

Probably because we’re getting close to the test.

Everyone is freaking out.

For example, last night, I was freaking out because I’m getting close to a test in my Statistical Methods class, and I couldn’t do my homework.

So I broke down and ate a kiwi.

Just one.

I swear to god my IQ increased 10 points immediately.

With my increased IQ, I decided to have a couple of ounces of wine. I mean, I already had a foot hanging off the side of the wagon.

With that small fortification, I was able to finish the pain in the ass assignment that I was doing (that ended up being 12 typed pages along with 4 pages of handwritten equations. SERIOUSLY?).

I have, perhaps, discovered that giving up sugar means that a tiny bit of sugar turns you into a superhero.

In order to maintain that superhero-like ability, I got back on the wagon for dinner.

Lasagnchiladas in the slow cooker
Inspired by… the internet, named by Crockett

  • 1/2 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cans (about 4 cups) cooked and drained black beans
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 – 8 ounces cheese
  • a big jar of simple salsa
  • 12 taco size tortillas (flour or corn)

About the ingredients. The cheese – anything you like. We happened to have a bag of pre-shredded low fat Mexican cheese blend, so I used that. It was the classy stuff (purchased on sale -Sargento I think) without a lot of stabilizers, so it melted nicely. If you use the other pre-shredded stuff it won’t be so drippy but eh. It’s still delicious. The salsa – just don’t go nuts. If you use chipotle pineapple salsa, it will totally change the dish. It might still be good, but who knows? This is a good place to play it safe. If you do go wacky with the salsa, rethink the chili powder and cumin. Or? Make your own salsa, you homemakin’ fool you. Finally, the tortillas – if you’ve given up sugar, you can substitute thin slices of summer squash, as I did.

Stir the beans, onions, chili powder, cumin, and salt together.

Pour about 1/4 of your salsa onto the bottom of your slow cooker.

Put in two tortillas (or however many cover the dish appropriately – if you have an enormous slow cooker, you might get less layers than I did) on top of the salsa. Put about 1/3 of the beans on the tortillas, then two more tortillas, then 1/4 of the salsa, then about 1/3 of the cheese. Repeat twice more – tortillas, beans, tortillas, salsa, cheese, tortillas, beans, tortillas, salsa… but WAIT. Hold the rest of the cheese.

Turn the slow cooker on high and let it go for 2 – 4 hours. (Or 6 – 8 on low). When you’re about 5 minutes from eating, dump the rest of the cheese on top and recover the slow cooker to let it melt.

Let your boyfriend come up with a wacky name for the dish, and eat it.

 

Also, try not to drip salsa on your schoolwork. I shoulda put that in the recipe.

I maintained my healthy eating today, too. I had more of the muffin fritatta things for breakfast (not pictured because come on, they’re little yellow muffins that you’ve seen before), and for lunch a delicious salad.

A buffalo salad.

Except without my chick’n patty, because vegetarian meat substitutes are not in any way low carb.

I would like to say that between the buffalo tofu, chickpeas, and mushrooms (all heated together in a nonstick pan prior to serving) I didn’t even miss the chick’n patty.

If I said that, though, I’d be lying.

Oh well.

 

 

 

white whale

Saturday, September 17th, 2011

 

Yesterday I got a (the last!) spot in my favorite parking lot.

It was obviously a sign.

I had a little snack while I walked to my car, so that I’d have enough energy to go to…

Since I had such good luck on campus, I thought maybe I’d try my luck after school at Target. Perhaps they would be restocking the Missoni zigzag sweater coat for the Saturday shoppers!

What. It could happen.

Sadly, the Missoni coats were still MIA. I did get the groceries and stuff that I like to get at Target though – cream cheese (always cheaper there), cotton swabs, stuff like that. Not produce. Never produce. (Why do I feel that Target is less reliable for produce than, say, Albertsons? No idea.)

Also, yes, everything in that picture that isn’t in a Target bag was in my car prior to my shopping trip. It’s all school papers and clothes (eventually) headed for Goodwill.

When I got home I stirred some rice and soy sauce up with an egg in a fry pan. I wanted a little lunch because last night was…

Oktoberfest!

Yeah, I know yesterday was September 16th. Since I’m not entirely sure what the history of Oktoberfest is, I’m not sure that’s wrong, but doesn’t it seem like Oktoberfest should be in October? Silly Louisville.

We ended up heading over there later than I’d expected, so I had a nectarine that had been in the fridge so long it was all wrinkly. It was so amazingly sweet – it literally tasted like I’d dipped each bite in honey.

Maida wanted some too.

Unfortunately, I forgot my camera. I did, however, remember both my phone and the always crucial ID. Dale’s Little Yella Pils for me thank you very much.

The band that was playing when we got there was (were?) The Beloved Invaders.

They’re surf rock.

I sort of feel like Louisville was phoning in the whole Oktoberfest thing.

The food choices were pretty limited.

Along with bratwurst and pizza by the slice, there was this guy – frying up Oreos and funnel cakes like there was no tomorrow.

Since we didn’t feel like sausages, we headed to The Empire for dinner after we’d had our Oktoberfill.

(See what I did there?)

Crockett had a BLAT.

I ate half.

I had a calamari salad.

Crockett ate half.

I guess, if you have someone to share dinner with, the white whale (or Missoni sweater) isn’t that important after all.

 

 

 

 

 

Crockett’s least favorite cookies

Sunday, May 15th, 2011

It’s so sad that he doesn’t like these, don’t you think? I mean, look at how pretty they are.

Of course, the problem lies in those dark nibby lookin’ things.

They ain’t chocolate.

They’re olives.

I know, it sounds weird. I’m probably not a good judge of if it is or isn’t, because olives are in my top ten favorite foods. Top five, even. Ok, lately, top three.

The olives don’t permeate all of the cookie with olive taste. Instead, they’re just surprising little salty briny pockets in what is otherwise a sweet crunchy cookie. They’re good as cookies, but I think they’d be a nice surprise on a cheese and cracker platter too.

Of course, I think olives would be a nice surprise under my pillow or at the bottom of my purse or in my sock drawer or… Basically Crockett and I are Jack Sprat and his lady, where olives are concerned.

Sweet Lemon and Black Olive Wafers
Adapted from Lottie + Doof

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar, divided in half
  • 1/4 cup butter, very soft
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons grated lemon zest
  • generous pinch kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup black olives, coarsely chopped (see note)
  1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Cut a piece of parchment for a baking sheet.
  2. Stir together the butter and the first half of the sugar until entirely combined. (You’re not creaming, necessarily, just making sure they’re mixed.) Add the egg and stir until combined.
  3. Add the flour, baking powder, salt, lemon zest, and olives and stir until it comes together in a cohesive dough. It will be crumbly but you need it to stick together when you press.
  4. Put the other half of the sugar in a small bowl. Pinch of rounded tablespoons of dough and roll them in the extra sugar, then put them on the baking sheet. You can fit about six to a sheet. Once you have all six, cover with another piece of parchment and roll all the cookies until they’re about 1/16th of an inch thick – the edges will be sloppy, but that’s what you want.
  5. Bake 10 to 12 minutes, or until the wafers are brown around the edges. Repeat with the remaining dough.

About the olives – the original recipe called for mild olives, rinsed if they were overly salty. I found them to be almost lost in the lemon flavor, so I recommend using something with a little more punch. The big black olives you can get in olive bars that still have the pits in would be a nice choice, or the teeny French nicoise olives you can find in the same place. Since you don’t need many, pitting them shouldn’t be  a big deal.

Mmm.

To apologize to Crockett for teasing him with cookies he wouldn’t eat in a million years, I tried a salady-salsay thing.

Ok, fine, it was also to cheer myself up. Since Wednesday our lovely summer weather has been supplanted by something that looks like it belongs in Portland.

Not that there’s anything wrong with Portland.

It’s just that this isn’t Portland. If I were in Portland, the rain would be ok. But this is sunny Colorado. We only get 30 – 40 entirely overcast days per year here. I don’t like it when 5 of them come in a row.

Bowl full o’ sunshine.

Sunshine Salad (Mango, Strawberry, and Avocado Salsa)
Adapted from Pink Parsley

  • 1 mango, peeled, pitted, and cut into 1/2 inch pieces (champagne mango, if you can – they’re sort of creamy like avocado and work really well here)
  • 3/4 cup fresh strawberries, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 avocado, pitted and cut into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoons agave nectar
  • 1 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoons orange juice
  • 1 teaspoons lime juice
  • pinch cayenne (you will barely taste it in the final product, but it adds a teeny tiny kick that’s worth having)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh mint (this is nice but not a deal breaker – you can substitute cilantro or basil, too)
  1. Mix together everything but the strawberries, mango, and avocado. Whisk well.
  2. In your serving or storage bowl, mix the strawberries, mango, and dressing. It won’t seem like a lot of dressing, but the fruit will start to release liquid and it will get wetter. Allow to sit for 15 minutes.
  3. Add the avocado and stir to mix.
  4. Serve with chips if you’re me, or over fish or chicken if that’s how you roll.

 

 

torta rustica (i.e. meat cake)

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

Crockett’s papa is visiting, and we’ve been mostly gabbing and drinking wine all weekend. I made him a coffee cake (which I’ll post the recipe for later, because it was pretty tasty and is holding up remarkably well), but I also had signed on as a volunteer recipe tester for the ‘your best recipe with fresh ricotta‘ contest. I have had problems with completing my testing on time before, but I happened to have some fresh ricotta in the fridge, and I couldn’t pass up this recipe.

It’s essentially a savory ricotta cheesecake with romano and salami, baked inside a giant sugar cookie.

See? Giant sugar cookie.

Full of cheese and salami.

I kept going – man, this is weird, and then taking another bite.

And then my piece was all gone.

So I started in on the ones I’d cut for Crockett and his dad.

Apparently I liked it.

Since  I was testing it, I was very faithful to the recipe (except that I cut it in half), so I’m not going to reprint it. It’s here, if you feel like making a sweet meat cake of your very own.

That’s not all I ate yesterday, of course.

I had some muesli, to pre-soak up all the nitrates that were undoubtably in the salami.

And some chicken chili, while doing homework.

Apparently the hanta virus isn’t affecting my appetite.

Or my desire to pose goofy with Crockett.

P.S. I don’t really have the hanta virus (probably). I spent a large part of the weekend cleaning out the garage of my condo, and a lot of mice have – ahem – left their mark there. Now I have a fluey chest cold type thing. Draw your own conclusions. Both Crockett and my girlfriend Star have drawn the conclusion that I’m a hypochondriac – which isn’t completely unfair, so jump on that bandwagon, if you’d like.

We need to have a serious talk

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Yogurt.

It’s like magic deliciousness in a designed to carry package.

Also, I think I might have the hanta virus. Or is it just hanta virus?

Crockett says I don’t.

I wonder if my chances of having the hanta virus are greater than my chances of winning the lottery.

 

extra milk

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Extra milk is a weird thing to have, don’t you think?

Extra milk.

Like, how much milk do you have, Emma?

Oh, definitely extra.

Anyway, we had almost an entire gallon of low fat milk that we had no plans for. Niether of us drink milk in a glass, and while I could make pastry cream or something I would then EAT that pastry cream, and everyone knows that eating pastry cream with a spoon isn’t the healthiest thing ever.

So I made ricotta instead. (Please do not point out the inconsistency between that statement and the one that immediately preceded it.)

I have a lot of happy ways to eat ricotta.

On toast with salt and honey, for example.

Or mixed with oats and milk for a sort of non-traditional muesli.

Alice approves.

A couple of days ago I took my dogs to the groomer, and while I was waiting, I went to a different grocery store than I usually do.

A grocery store that had ten pounds of grapefruit for $2.50.

Yeah.

We have a lot of grapefruit now.

Also, four pounds of strawberries for $5.

I love spring.

So, you can only eat so much ricotta.

Earthbound Farms had the best idea of anything I’ve ever heard, so I used it to break my ricotta streak.

It’s half Spring Mix and half Baby Spinach.

With Morningstar Farms crunchy faux chik’n.

Mmm.